Challenges of Ethical Traceability to the Public-Private Divide

  • Christian Coff
Part of the The International Library of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Ethics book series (LEAF, volume 15)

Ethical traceability and informed food choice challenge the way we think of the two main spheres of society: public and private. The public sphere typically includes the state, the media, democratic political deliberation, public opinion, advertisements, books, buildings, plays, public transportation, etc. Public means open and visible. The private, on the other hand, is the sphere of that which cannot be seen or heard. It is the ‘un-common’ world, characterized by intimacy, individuality, family life, (private) property, private transportation, private businesses, etc.

Ethical traceability and informed food choice challenge this divide because they seem to have a foot in both camps. On the one hand, ethical traceability addresses the common good in society – and more specifically in the food production chain. Ethical traceability is public in the sense that it belongs to the sphere of public goods. Furthermore, it contains elements of the public sphere as public discussion about the content of ethical traceability schemes is paramount for the framing of such schemes (see Chapter 11 for elaboration of this idea).

Keywords

Europe Transportation Marketing Coherence Expense 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Coff
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Ethics and LawDenmark

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