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Perceptions of Citizenship Qualities Among Asian Educational Leaders

  • W. O. Lee
Part of the CERC Studies in Comparative Education book series (CERC, volume 14)

Abstract

Developing good citizenship has been a continuing educational concern worldwide. As a report on the civic education study of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) has noted, ‘All societies have a continuing interest in the way their young people are prepared for citizenship and learn to take part in public affairs’ (Torney-Purta, Schwille, & Amadeo, 1999, p. 12). This overall statement was actually drawn from the country case reports included in the civic education study. For example, the Australian chapter reported that ‘active citizenship education’ became a key objective of the curriculum at the turn of the 1990s (Print, Kennedy, & Hughes, 1999, p. 39). The Belgian chapter indicated that in 1994 a decree was published in the official gazette, Moniteur Belge, demanding that teachers should prepare students to become responsible citizens who possess the qualities required in a pluralist society (Blondin & Schillings, 1999, p. 64). The Canadian chapter remarked that there was country-wide acknowledgment that citizenship education is the responsibility of schools, and such an expectation is explicitly expressed in the social studies curriculum: ‘responsible citizenship is the ultimate goal of social studies’ (Sears, Clarke, & Hughes, 1999, p. 129).

Keywords

Critical Thinking National Identity Personal Autonomy Military Training Educational Leader 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Acknowledgements

  1. This chapter is a revised version of the keynote address presented in the plenary panel on The Citizen of the New Century, Fifth UNESCO-ACEID International Conference on Reforming Learning, Curriculum and Pedagogy: Innovative Visions for the New Century, entitled ‘Qualities of Citizenship for the New Century: Perceptions of Asian Educational Leaders’. 13–16 December 1999, Bangkok, Thailand. The author wishes to acknowledge Sara Wong for her valuable assistance in the process of conducting this research.Google Scholar

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

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  • W. O. Lee

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