Evolutionary Morphology of the Guenon Postcranium and Its Taxonomic Implications

  • Eric J. Sargis
  • Carl J. Terranova
  • Daniel L. Gebo
Part of the Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology Series book series (VERT)

Guenons (Primates, Cercopithecini) are relatively smallbodied (Table 16.1) Old World monkeys endemic to Africa. They exhibit a variety of substrate preferences, spanning from arboreal to semiterrestrial to terrestrial (Table 16.2). The ancestral guenon was likely arboreal; indeed, the postcranial morphology of semiterrestrial guenons, including the basal Allenopithecus (Tosi et al., 2004, 2005), resembles that of their arboreal relatives (Gebo and Sargis, 1994). Morphological modifications attributable to terrestriality are only found in three guenon taxa (Gebo and Sargis, 1994): patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas), the lhoesti group (Cercopithecus lhoesti, C. preussi, and C. solatus), and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops; Manaster, 1979; Anapol and Gray, 2003; Anapol et al., 2005).

Keywords

Cage Crest Flange Paleontology Oates 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric J. Sargis
    • 1
  • Carl J. Terranova
    • 2
  • Daniel L. Gebo
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyTouro College of Osteopathic MedicineNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of AnthropologyNorthern Illinois UniversityDekalbUSA

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