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Toward a Theory of Faculty Professional Choices in Teaching That Foster College Student Success

  • John M. Braxton
Part of the Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 23)

This chapter posits a theory of faculty professional choices in teaching that enhance Course-level learning by college students. The formulations of this theory spring from Extensions of role theory and expectancy motivation theory to the case of faculty teaching role performance. The formulations of this theory also emerge from literature-based aspects of teaching that enhance student course learning and potential sources of influence on such teaching. This chapter describes such aspects of teaching as pedagogical practices, course assessment activities, the tenets of good teaching practices, engagement in the scholarship of teaching and adherence to norms that proscribe inappropriate teaching behaviors. This chapter also discusses the types of influence that student peer groups, organizational influences and state-level policies and practices may wield on faculty professional choices in their teaching. Recommendations for testing this theory’s seven hypotheses are also outlined in this chapter.

Keywords

Faculty Member Pedagogical Content Knowledge Student Success Expectancy Theory Teaching Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Braxton
    • 1
  1. 1.Higher Education Leadership and Policy ProgramVanderbilt UniversityUSA

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