Response to Ozone of Fagus sylvatica L. Seedlings Under Competition, in an Open-Top Chamber Experiment: A Chlorophyll Fluorescence Analysis

  • Filippo Bussotti
  • Chiara Cascio
  • Reto J. Strasser
  • Kristopher Novak

Abstract

This study was carried out within an open-top chamber facility in Southern Switzerland. The experiment was performed in the year 2004 and consisted in small populations of Fagus sylvatica L. seedlings growing in pure culture and under the competition of Viburnum lantana L. seedlings, in sub-plots in four non filtered (NF, i.e. treated with ambient air) and four charcoal-filtered chambers (CF, i.e. treated with air containing 50% of ambient air ozone). Chlorophyll a fluorescence of the PS II was measured once a month from June to September 2004. PS II efficiency and performances tended to decrease over time in the NF chambers as compared to CF ones, in the Fagus sylvatica plants growing without competition. On the other hand, the presence of Viburnum lantana (which grows faster than Fagus sylvatica) seemed to protect the photosynthesis machinery of the Fagus sylvatica plants growing under competition.

Keywords

Chlorophyll fluorescence competition Fagus sylvatica rising transient open-top chambers ozone 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Filippo Bussotti
    • 1
  • Chiara Cascio
    • 1
  • Reto J. Strasser
    • 2
  • Kristopher Novak
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of FlorenceFirenzeItaly
  2. 2.Bioenergetics LaboratoryUniversity of GenevaJussy-GenevaSwitzerland
  3. 3.Birmensdorf - Agroscope FAL ReckenholzWSLJussy-GenevaSwitzerland

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