Mapping Lagoonal Features and Their Variability: Field Observations and Remote Sensing Implications

  • U. S. Panda
  • P. K. Mohanty
  • S. R. Pal
  • G. N. Mohapatra
  • P. Mishra
  • G. Jayaraman

Abstract

Lagoons have been historically important as sheltered sites of habitation providing access to both the land and the sea, comprising 15% of the world coastal zone, in which lakes, salt marshes, tropical mangroves, swamps and deltas are also included. Natural changes resulting from physical, chemical, geological, and biological factors and the influence of climatic changes will alter the essential character of the lagoon and hence the ecosystem. For example, excessive runoff due to flood during heavy rainfall may cause a chain of events like increase in sediment load leading to turbidity which tends to reduce sunlight penetration which in turn gives rise to lowered primary productivity. Long term unpredictable climatic variations such as tidal waves, hurricanes, cyclonic storms might also cause irreversible changes through sediment loading, alteration of flushing rates of lagoons and production processes (Fisher et al., 1972). So it is important that the maximum benefit from these areas be obtained without jeopardizing the future options or continued use.

Keywords

Zinc Toxicity Magnesium Chlorophyll Silicate 

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Copyright information

© Capital Publishing Company 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. S. Panda
    • 3
  • P. K. Mohanty
    • 3
  • S. R. Pal
    • 3
  • G. N. Mohapatra
    • 3
  • P. Mishra
    • 1
  • G. Jayaraman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Ocean DevelopmentNIOT CampusPallikaranai, Chennai
  2. 2.Centre for Atmospheric SciencesIndian Institute of TechnologyNew Delhi
  3. 3.Department of Marine SciencesBerhampur UniversityBerhampur

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