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Enhancement of the Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis Pathway Improves Grain Yield in Rice

  • Chuan-Yin Wu
  • Shing Kwok
  • Sam Harris
  • Anthony Trieu
  • Parthiban Radhakrishnan
  • Andres Salazar
  • Ke Zhang
  • Jiulin Wang
  • Jianmin Wan
  • Shozo Fujioka
  • Ken Feldmann
  • Roger Pennell
Conference paper

Many of the semi-dwarf but high-yielding crop varieties that were developed during Green Revolution are defective in gibberellin biosynthesis or unresponsive to gibberellin (Peng et al., 1999). Of the other kinds of plant hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs) seem to be among the most useful for controlling crop productivity –BR mutants can also be dwarfs and over-expression lines can be high yielding (Choe et al., 2001; Mori et al., 2002; Sakamoto et al., 2006).

Keywords

Seed Yield Green Revolution Gibberellin Biosynthesis Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis Rice Dwarf Mutant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chuan-Yin Wu
    • 1
  • Shing Kwok
    • 1
  • Sam Harris
    • 1
  • Anthony Trieu
    • 1
  • Parthiban Radhakrishnan
    • 1
  • Andres Salazar
    • 1
  • Ke Zhang
    • 1
  • Jiulin Wang
    • 2
  • Jianmin Wan
    • 2
  • Shozo Fujioka
    • 3
  • Ken Feldmann
    • 1
  • Roger Pennell
    • 1
  1. 1.Ceres, Inc.Thousand OaksUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Crop SciencesChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesChina
  3. 3.Plant Functions LaboratoryWako-shiJapan

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