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New Developments in Surface-to-Surface Discretization Strategies for Analysis of Interface Mechanics

  • Tod A. Laursen
  • Bin Yang
Part of the Computational Methods in Applied Sciences book series (COMPUTMETHODS, volume 7)

Summary

This article summarizes recent results pertaining to the implementation of mortar-based contact formulations in nonlinear computational solid mechanics. In particular, the authors discuss extension of the mortar framework to encompass large sliding, searching algorithms, treatment of self-contact phenomena, and use of the mortar framework to treat problems of lubricated contact.

Keywords

Contact Problem Discretization Strategy Reynolds Equation Dual Graph Interface Mechanics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Computational Mechanics Laboratory Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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