Self-Study in School Teaching: Teachers’ Perspectives

  • Terri Austin
  • Joseph C. Senese
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 12)

Abstract

This chapter defines self-study for classroom teachers and points out potential benefits and the conditions necessary to begin. The chapter also provides information about realistically carrying out self-study in a school setting. Having a core set of beliefs that inform daily practice, a reflective nature, and a yearning to improve self and practice can lead teachers to the resources they need to conduct meaningful research and self-study. Benefits for teachers range from the practical (imparting an endorsement and authority for practice) to the personal (informing teachers about who they are) to the professional (inviting teachers to join a community of learners). Self-study urges teachers to find their own voices, to improve their practices, to extend their relationships, and to discoffer and document their potential as leaders of change. Because self-study concentrates on what matters most to teachers, the chapter encourages teachers to include self-study in the ever-growing list of professional expectations and responsibilities. Self-study is about who teachers are as well as what they do. The authors argue that there is no better way to strengthen teaching practices, to recognize the influence of personal values and beliefs, and to enrich students’ learning.

Keywords

Arena Lewin Hate Dole Amaze 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terri Austin
    • 1
  • Joseph C. Senese
    • 2
  1. 1.Chinook Montessori Charter SchoolFairbanksAlaska
  2. 2.Highland Park High SchoolHighland Parkllinois

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