Visual Artistic Modes of Representation for Self-Study

  • Weber Sandra
  • Mitchell Claudia
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 12)

Abstract

In this chapter we explore some of the innovative ways in which teachers and teacher educators are using visual culture and arts-informed research methods to reinterpret, represent and communicate their self-study research. Our focus is on how educational researchers and teachers are modifying and using these methods to craft artistic representations and interpretations of their self-studies. The reflexive nature of artistic inquiry makes it particularly well-suited to self-study. Section 1 examines the tradition of visual arts-based research and explores its usefulness to self-study. Sections 2–4 of this chapter explore four of the most prevalent modes of visual artistic expression that are being used to interpret and report on self-study in education: (1) performance; (2) photography; (3) video documentary; and, (4) art installations/multi media representations. Each of these sections contains detailed exemplars of these modes of representation. This chapter concludes with questions and quandaries about the uses and interpretation of these modes of inquiry. More detailed exemplars are included on the accompanying CD.

Keywords

Smoke Kelly Tempo Editing Univer 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Weber Sandra
    • 1
  • Mitchell Claudia
    • 2
  1. 1.Concordia UniversityMontreal
  2. 2.McGill UniversityCanada

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