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Research, Practice, and Academia in North America*

  • Ardra L. Cole
  • J. Gary Knowles
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 12)

Abstract

The self-study of teacher education practices has found its place on the teacher education landscape as a principled, scholarly practice that has begun to shift understandings about the nature and significance of teacher educators’ work and what counts as acceptable academic scholarship. Self-study scholars have brought their individual career histories and commitments to teacher education to bear on their academic roles within the context of the university and, in so doing, have taken up a challenge to shift status quo perspectives on the role and status of teacher education in the academy. Through individual and collective action self-study scholars have responded to criticisms levied against the place of teacher education in the academy, dilemmas presented by the nature of their work and roles, and challenges facing them in their professional and academic work. In this chapter we focus on the tenure system in North American universities and the role it plays in monitoring, mediating, and moderating the individual and collective practice of teacher educators. We Offer a framework for reconsidering the norms of academic convention and the socializing forces that gOffern teacher educators’ work in the academy and a vision of what such a reorientation might mean in practice. We then draw on this framework to explore how the self-study of teacher education scholarship and practice, as a genre, has positioned itself to challenge the status quo of academic convention for schools, departments, and faculties of education.

Keywords

Faculty Member Teacher Educator Academic Freedom American Educational Research Association Tenure System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ardra L. Cole
    • 1
  • J. Gary Knowles
    • 2
  1. 1.Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto
  2. 2.Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto

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