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Perspectives on Children and Violence

  • Jenny Parkes
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 22)

There can be no compromise in challenging violence against children. Children's uniqueness — their human potential, their initial fragility and vulnerability, their dependence on adults for their growth and development — make an unassailable case for more, not less, investment in prevention and protection from violence. (Pinheiro, 2006)

Keywords

Community Violence Violence Exposure Political Violence Child Soldier Gender Violence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Jenny Parkes

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