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Monitoring of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in a Water Treatment Process by UV-Laser Induced Fluorescence

  • Uwe Wachsmuth
  • Matthias Niederkrüger
  • Gerd Marowsky
  • Norbert Konradt
  • Hans-Peter Rohns

Results of online investigations of water quality during a water treatment process by ultraviolet-laser-induced fl uorescence (UV-LIF) are presented. In the fi rst part the integrated fl uorescence intensity is correlated to the classically determined concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Decision, detection and determination limits are evaluated for this procedure and online DOC measurements conducted with the presented LIF system are compared to reference analysis. In the second part the ozone demand in the water treatment process is derived from the LIF-signal directly. The calibration was done by correlating LIF-signals with the ozone doses for different conditions and a defi nite residual ozone concentration in the processed water.

Keywords: Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), drinking water, laser induced fluorescence, online process control, real-time measurements

Keywords

Humic Substance Dissolve Organic Carbon Concentration Bank Filtrate Water Treatment Process Ozone Dosage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Uwe Wachsmuth
    • 1
  • Matthias Niederkrüger
    • 2
  • Gerd Marowsky
    • 2
  • Norbert Konradt
    • 3
  • Hans-Peter Rohns
    • 3
  1. 1.Laser-Laboratorium Göttingen GmbHGermany
  2. 2.Laser-Laboratorium Göttingen e.VGermany
  3. 3.Stadtwerke Düsseldorf AGQualitätsüberwachung WasserGermany

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