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Lentil pp 23-32 | Cite as

Adaptation and Ecology

Chapter

Abstract

Worldwide, the major abiotic restrictions on yield of lentil are drought (usually linked with high temperature) and low temperature. LENMOD, a lentil crop growth model, gives greater understanding of how different climatic factors, including water availability and temperature, interact to determine lentil crop growth and yield. This model has considerable potential in predicting where lentil may be grown successfully. Breeding programmes are underway with the objectives of increasing adaptation of lentil to stress environments. The strategy used to combat drought has been to match the crop’s development with the period of soil moisture availability. Genotypes with early seedling establishment, early and rapid biomass development and early flowering and maturity have been selected in sites of extremely low rainfall. Also, seed has been sown earlier in the spring or in the autumn. Success in the production of cold tolerant cultivars has been achieved by field screening of lentils in areas prone to extreme cold. High yielding varieties have been released for use in sites which experience over winter temperatures of -12 to -30° C

Keywords

Seed Yield Leaf Area Index Faba Bean Sowing Date Ascochyta Blight 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of SciencesUniversity of SunderlandSunderlandUK
  2. 2.Agriculture Group Agriculture and Life ScienceDivision PO Box 84 Lincoln UniversityCanterburyNew Zealand

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