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Lentil pp 209-224 | Cite as

Mutation Breeding

Chapter

Abstract

When genetic variability is narrowed using traditional breeding methods for a long period, induced mutations are one of the most important approaches for broadening the genetic variation in lentil to circumvent the bottleneck conditions. The aim of this chapter is to review lentil breeding using induced mutations from the beginning of mutation breeding work to the present and to list the outcomes of mutagenesis works on lentils. The number of mutant varieties of all species officially released and recorded in the Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency (FAO/IAEA) Mutant Varieties Database is over 2300. From these mutant varieties, more than 265 grain legume cultivars have been developed using induced mutations and have subsequently been released. Gamma rays were the most frequently used technique to alter genes. Many mutant lentils have been mentioned in the available literature while seven mutants have been released for commercial production so far. Mutant lentils have now contributed several million dollars annually to global agriculture. Several specific regional problems in lentil production areas have been coped with using mutant lentil cultivars. Fundamental genetics, physiological and molecular studies will also be come to light using mutant lentils

Keywords

International Atomic Energy Agency Mutant Variety Lens Culinaris Maleic Hydrazide Mutation Breeding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Field Crops,Faculty of AgricultureAkdeniz UniversityTR-07058 AntalyaTurkey
  2. 2.Pulse Laboratory, Division of GeneticsIndian Agricultural Research InstituteNew Delhi 110012India
  3. 3.Department of Plant BreedingChaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University Hisar 125004India

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