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The effect of the CABLE approach on the levels of mental engagement of students in computer programming

  • Dr Ioana Tuugalei
  • Chan Mow
  • Dr Wing Au
  • Dr Gregory Yates

Abstract

This paper reports on the findings of the third of a series of trials (Project 3) which evaluated the impact of CABLE, a cognitive apprenticeship based learning environment on the teaching of computer programming at the National University of Samoa The results of the first two trials (Project 1 and Project 2) had shown that students exposed to CABLE evidenced increased scores on a post-test relative to those taught in the traditional (non-CABLE) mode of instruction. The aim of Project 3 was to investigate the effect of CABLE on the levels of mental engagement of students. The results of Project 3 indicated significant differences, in the levels of mental engagement, in students taught programming skills within CABLE classes, when compared to students taught programming skills within non-CABLE classes.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dr Ioana Tuugalei
    • 1
  • Chan Mow
    • 1
  • Dr Wing Au
    • 2
  • Dr Gregory Yates
    • 2
  1. 1.National University of SamoaSamoa
  2. 2.University of South AustraliaAustralia

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