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An International and Social Perspective on Career Guidance

  • James A. Athanasou
  • Raoul Van Esbroeck

Notwithstanding its different manifestations throughout the world and across history, it is clear that career guidance has a constant and unique focus. Despite a plethora of theories, policies and approaches the personal and fundamental issue in career guidance is still that of one’s career! The purpose of this chapter is to draw together some themes that relate to career guidance on a broader scale, both socially and internationally. Technical aspects of career guidance, in particular related to cross-cultural influences or counselling approaches for different groups or globalisation are not the focus of this section as there has been ample discussion already in the previous chapters of the Handbook.

Of course there will be many different perspectives that have an impact upon career guidance. Those selected for this chapter are reflected in the fact that guidance is essentially a value-laden normative activity. It is not viewed as just the dispassionate provision of information or counselling techniques or career services. It is considered that there are ethical and social aspects that are fundamental to career guidance provision internationally. Two broad factors that have an impact upon career guidance perspectives throughout the world are considered in this chapter and for want of better titles are described as (a) individual and vocational factors; and (b) guidance delivery factors. The first section of this chapter considers the background of career guidance as a basis for understanding the perspectives that already had an impact upon it. Then some selected social and international perspectives relevant to career guidance are considered jointly as part of the existential issues facing each person and each practitioner. At the outset, no claim is made that the discussion is comprehensive or all-encompassing.

Of course there will be many different perspectives that have an impact upon career guidance. Those selected for this chapter are reflected in the fact that guidance is essentially a value-laden normative activity. It is not viewed as just the dispassionate provision of information or counselling techniques or career services. It is considered that there are ethical and social aspects that are fundamental to career guidance provision internationally. Two broad factors that have an impact upon career guidance perspectives throughout the world are considered in this chapter and for want of better titles are described as (a) individual and vocational factors; and (b) guidance delivery factors. The first section of this chapter considers the background of career guidance as a basis for understanding the perspectives that already had an impact upon it. Then some selected social and international perspectives relevant to career guidance are considered jointly as part of the existential issues facing each person and each practitioner. At the outset, no claim is made that the discussion is comprehensive or all-encompassing.

Keywords

Informal Career Career Development Employment Service Career Guidance Social Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • James A. Athanasou
    • 1
  • Raoul Van Esbroeck
    • 2
  1. 1.University of TechnologySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Vrije Universiteit BrusselBelgium

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