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Conclusion: The Need to Rebuild the Public Domain

  • Simon Lee
  • Stephen Mcbride

The contributors to this volume have attempted to demonstrate that the exercise of state power and the pattern of global governance that has developed during the era of the hegemony of neo-liberalism have not followed a single, ‘one-size-fits-all’ trajectory. On the contrary, far from institutional and policy convergence, in the face of an irresistible tide of neo-liberal globalization, there has been great diversity in the responses to the exigencies of the Washington Consensus.

Keywords

International Monetary Fund Public Domain Good Governance United Nations Development Programme Global Governance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Lee
    • 1
  • Stephen Mcbride
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Politics and International StudiesUniversity of HullUK
  2. 2.Department of Political ScienceSimon Fraser UniversityCanada

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