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Environmentally Responsible Aquaculture: Realities and Possibilities

  • Theresa M. Bert
Part of the Methods and Technologies in Fish Biology and Fisheries book series (REME, volume 6)

The effects of aquaculture range from highly detrimental to highly beneficial, depending on perspective of the observer and type of the aquaculture activity. Industry leaders and those who monitor and govern the industry are aware of the adverse effects and have taken a number of actions to mitigate them. Solving these problems often requires employing common solutions that apply to many types of aquaculture but may require employing unique solutions as well. Ecologically and genetically sound solutions that have proven successful include the following: culturing native species; gathering baseline data on the distribution and abundance of native species before aquaculture is initiated so that aquaculture effects can be monitored; placing aquaculture facilities in areas able to withstand the unusual chemical and organic loads that aquaculture places on the environment and living communities; eliminating aquaculture activities in at least some selected regions; using polyculture, integrated-aquaculture, or closed-system aquaculture systems that include animals or plants capable of assisting with nutrient removal at some level; and using stocking practices and sufficient numbers of broodstock to prevent genetic problems. Considerable progress toward conducting environmentally responsible aquaculture has already been made in a number of ways and in many areas of the world. Industry participants and governmental, political, conservation, and scientific leaders have specific responsibilities associated with advancing the practice of environmentally responsible aquaculture. Because the practice of aquaculture is intimately linked to, and dependent upon, the environment, preserving the environment will ultimately preserve the ability to conduct aquaculture on a sustainable basis.

Keywords

Native Species Alien Species Aquaculture Industry Hatchery Fish Deutsche Gesellschaft 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theresa M. Bert
    • 1
  1. 1.Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation CommissionFishand Wildlife Research InstituteSt. PetersburgUSA

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