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Introduced Anadromous Salmonids in Patagonia: Risks, Uses, and a Conservation Paradox

  • Miguel A. Pascual
  • Javier E. Ciancio
Part of the Methods and Technologies in Fish Biology and Fisheries book series (REME, volume 6)

Because of their peculiar life cycle, introduced anadromous salmonids can have cascading effects on both marine and freshwater communities. From an ecological standpoint, there are three aspects of exotic salmonids that merit special attention: the factors that govern the establishment of wild populations, the impact of the introduced fish on the receiving communities, and their adaptations to the new environments. Here, we examine several case studies dealing with anadromous salmonids introduced in Patagonia, the southern region of Argentina, from these three viewpoints.

Keywords

Rainbow Trout Brown Trout Chinook Salmon Sockeye Salmon Pink Salmon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miguel A. Pascual
    • 1
  • Javier E. Ciancio
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro Nacional Patagónico—CONICETPuerto MadrynArgentina

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