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Plasma Opacity and Laser Ablation Measurements Using X-Ray Lasers

  • G. J. Tallents
  • M. H. Edwards
  • D. Whittaker
  • N. Booth
  • H. Huang
  • P. Mistry
  • G.J. Pert
  • B. Rus
  • T. Mocek
  • M. Koslovà
  • J. Polan
  • A. Praeg
  • M. Stupka
  • P. Homer
  • C. McKenna
  • A. Delserieys
  • C. L. S. Lewis
  • M. Notley
  • D. Neely
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 115)

Summary

The use of x-ray lasers as probes of the opacity of hot dense plasma and rates of laser ablation is considered. It is shown that x-ray lasers are sufficiently bright to overcome plasma emission and enable plasma opacity to be measured. A demonstration experiment is presented where the temporal evolution of the opacity of a thin iron plasma at high temperature (30 – 250 eV) formed from an initially 50 nm thick solid tamped with a plastic overlay after heating by a laser pulse has been measured using the transmission of a nickel-like silver x-ray laser at 13.9 nm. The experimental results are compared to transmission calculations based on the iron opacity evaluated in a post-processor from predictions of the plasma conditions using a fluid and atomic physics code (EHYBRID). In another experiment, it is shown that laser ablation of a solid iron layer that is not tamped can be determined by the change in transmission of a 21.2 nm x-ray laser.

Keywords

Laser Ablation Sample Target Main Pulse Iron Layer Laser Energy Absorption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. J. Tallents
    • 1
  • M. H. Edwards
    • 1
  • D. Whittaker
    • 1
  • N. Booth
    • 1
  • H. Huang
    • 1
  • P. Mistry
    • 1
  • G.J. Pert
    • 1
  • B. Rus
    • 2
  • T. Mocek
    • 2
  • M. Koslovà
    • 2
  • J. Polan
    • 2
  • A. Praeg
    • 2
  • M. Stupka
    • 2
  • P. Homer
    • 2
  • C. McKenna
    • 3
  • A. Delserieys
    • 3
  • C. L. S. Lewis
    • 3
  • M. Notley
    • 4
  • D. Neely
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of YorkYorkU.K.
  2. 2.Department of X-ray Lasers, PALS Research Centre, Institute of PhysicsAcademy of Sciences of the Czech Republic182 21 Prague 8Czech Republic
  3. 3.School of Mathematics and PhysicsQueen’ University of BelfastBelfastU.K.
  4. 4.Central Laser FacilityRutherford Appleton LaboratoryChiltonU.K.

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