Abstract

A decade has past since I last reviewed the various ways in which studies of dental development can contribute to what was then still called hominid paleobiology (Wood, 1996) A little more than eighty years have passed but Adolph Schultz’s (1924) seminal contribution is still largely ignored and his paper is seldom cited.

Keywords

Hunt Palaeontology 

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References

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© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyThe George Washington University CASHPWashingtonUSA

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