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Cross-cultural Quality of Life Research in Mental Health

Conceptual approaches, assessment strategies, empirical results and potential impact
  • Monika Bullinger
  • Silke Schmidt
  • Dieter Naber
Chapter

Keywords

Life Assessment Nottingham Health Profile Social Indicator Research Health Care Field Subjective Health Measure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monika Bullinger
    • 1
  • Silke Schmidt
    • 1
  • Dieter Naber
    • 2
  1. 1.University Medical Centre of Hamburg EppendorfInstitute and Policlinic for Medical PsychologyHamburgGermany
  2. 2.University Medical Centre of Hamburg EppendorfDepartment of PsychiatryCenter of Psychosocial MedicineGermany

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