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Leadership Development for School Effectiveness and Improvement in East Asia

  • Allan Walker
  • Philip Hallinger
  • Haiyan Qian
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 17)

Keywords

Professional Development School Principal Education Reform School Leadership Continue Professional Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allan Walker
  • Philip Hallinger
  • Haiyan Qian

There are no affiliations available

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