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Aridic Soils, Patterned Ground, and Desert Pavements

  • John C. Dixon

Pedogenic and geomorphic processes operating in deserts are inextricably linked. These linkages are particularly well expressed in the development of patterned ground and desert pavement. In addition, the nature and efficacy of hydraulic, gravitational, and aeolian processes on desert surfaces are strongly influenced by the physical and chemical characteristics of the underlying soils. As a result, the evolution of a diversity of desert landforms is either directly or indirectly linked to pedogenic processes.

Keywords

Soil Science Society Desert Soil Soil Survey Staff Mojave Desert Aridic Soil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • John C. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeosciencesUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA

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