The Nexus of Knowledge and Space

  • Peter Meusburger
Part of the Knowledge and Space book series (KNAS, volume 1)

The author debates some of the reasons why spatial disparities of knowledge evolve and why they are so persistent. The most prominent causes for spatial disparities of knowledge are the division of labor, the growth of complex social systems, the emergence of hierarchies, and the asymmetry of power relations in social systems. Before discussing relations between knowledge and space, the author inquires into concepts of space, place, spatiality, and spatial scales. He explains why many aspects of knowledge, education, and science cannot be perceived, described, and explained adequately if the spatial dimension is ignored. The proper consideration of spatial concepts and space–time has crucial effects upon the way theories and understandings are articulated and developed and upon the way the nexus of knowledge and space can be explicated. The author reviews the significance of spatial contexts for generating, legitimating, controlling, manipulating, and applying knowledge, especially scientific knowledge, and presents a brief report on the development and main research issues of geographies of education, knowledge, and science. The final part proposes a model for the spatial diffusion of various types of knowledge.

Keywords

Europe Marketing Arena Egypt Burial 

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© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Meusburger
    • 1
  1. 1.Geographisches InstitutUniversität HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany

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