Planning for Education and Work: Alternatives and Issues

  • Dennis R. Herschbach

Planning is vitally important in the world of education and training. There are immense and ever-increasing pressures to provide more and better services. Policy-makers in many countries are attempting to fundamentally restructure the ways that youth and adults prepare for employment in order to make more effective use of limited resources, expand opportunity, help alleviate poverty and address the skill demands generated by an ever-pervasive global economy. Policy-makers look to planning as a means of bringing programme development and resource allocation and use into line with labour-market and social development objectives. However, there is considerably more awareness today than in the past of the complexities of planning for technical and vocational education and training (TVET). The outcomes of many national planning efforts undertaken in the past can best be described as highly mixed. Overall, there has been a general failure to take fully into account the critical importance of implementation. Many planning efforts have gone astray because decision-making was too remote from the practical issues of programme implementation. Today planning is approached with a greater awareness of the methodological limitations and complexity of the issues confronted.

Keywords

Migration Income Mane Arena Stake 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis R. Herschbach
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Education Policy and LeadershipUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUnited States of America

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