Reforming Skills Development, Transforming the Nation: South African Vocational Education and Training Reforms, 1994–2005

  • Simon McGrath

In an era where vocational education and training (VET) reform is common, South Africa provides one of the most striking national case studies of the complex interplay between international discourses of both economic change and VET reform, and historical and contemporary forces at the national level. Moreover, the twin imperative of economic and social focus for VET is made particularly complex and challenging by the legacy of apartheid.

Keywords

Migration Income Coherence Assure Trade Unionism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon McGrath
    • 1
  1. 1.UNESCO Centre for Comparative Education ResearchUniversity of NottinghamUnited Kingdom

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