This chapter presents an overview of the topical discourses in technical and vocational education and training (TVET) with and for youth as a central theme of action and sets the context for the diversity of the debates that follow in this section. In developed, transitional and developing economies adult learning with and for young people is undertaken across a spectrum of institutional, workplace and community contexts, and supplied by a range of public, private and non-governmental providers of TVET. At the policy level, TVET plays a critical access and equity role in achieving employment for youth, managing work/life balance, and providing citizenship and parenting skills for young people. At the provision level, expanding TVET is integral for second-chance education for youth in crisis or post-conflict situations, tackling poverty, inequity, and promulgating cultural inclusion for tolerant, peaceful societies.

Keywords

Europe OECD Metaphor Dian Karen 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Plane
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Research in Education Equity and WorkUniversity of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia

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