Work-Based Learning: An English Experience

  • James Avis

This chapter explores work-based learning in the context of changes taking place in vocational education and training in England, locating these within an understanding of the economy and the way in which work-based knowledge is construed. It draws upon literature that examines the work-based experiences of young people, illustrating the tension between understandings of work-based learning that stress knowledge creation and those orientated towards young people disaffected from schooling.

Keywords

Income 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Avis
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Education and Professional DevelopmentUniversity of HuddersfieldUnited Kingdom

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