Advertisement

Dimensions of Diversity: Educating Urban Township Learners, a Case of Umlazi Township School in Durban, South Africa

  • Thabisile Buthelezi
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 19)

This chapter examines educational tensions and social constraints existing in the South African urban township environment that make it difficult for learners in these contexts to receive quality education. In the learners’ perceptions and experiences reported in this chapter, I identify the specific daily challenges that learners experience in both township life and the township school. Here, I argue that these challenges make youth in the township settings more vulnerable to HIV infection, different forms of violence, substance and alcohol abuse, teenage pregnancy, suicide, child abuse, and so on. Based on the analysis of stories, drawings and poems that were written by learners from a secondary school at Umlazi Township, near Durban in South Africa, I further discuss the negative effects of the township context on learners.

Keywords

Corporal Punishment African Child Dialogue Journal Life Orientation South African Journal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abolition of Corporal Punishment Act, Act No 33 of 1997.Google Scholar
  2. Allen, R. E. (Ed.) (1992). The concise oxford dictionary of current English. London: BCA.Google Scholar
  3. Babbie, E., & Mouton, J. (2002). The practice of social research. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bhengu, R. (2004). My Soweto. In A. Roberts, & J. Thloloe (Eds.), Soweto inside out: Stories about Africa's famous township (pp. 43–47). Johannesburg: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  5. Brady, M., & Rendall-Mkosi, K. (2005). Tackling alcohol problems: Strengthening community action in South Africa. Cape Town: University of western Cape, School of Public Health.Google Scholar
  6. Brink, E., Malungana, G., Lebelo, S., Ntshangase, D., & Krige, S. (2001). Soweto: 16 June 1976. Cape Town: Kwela Books.Google Scholar
  7. Bronfenbrenner, U. (1984). The changing family in a changing world: America first? Peabody Journal of Education, 61 (3), 52–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cele, N. (2004). “Equity of access” and “equity of outcomes” challenged by language policy, politics and practice in South African higher education: The myth of language equality in education. South African Journal of Higher Education, 18 (1), 38–56.Google Scholar
  9. Chisholm, H., & Muller, J. (2000). A South African curriculum for the twenty first century. Report of the review committee on Curriculum 2005. Pretoria: Department of Education.Google Scholar
  10. Davidoff, S., & Lazarus, S. (2002). The learning school: An organisation development approach. Second edition. Cape Town: Juta.Google Scholar
  11. Department of Education. (1996). South African Schools Act, No 84 of 1996.Google Scholar
  12. Department of Education. (1998). Norms and Standards for School Funding. Pretoria: Department of Education of South Africa.Google Scholar
  13. Department of Education. (2002). Revised National Curriculum Statement (Schools). Pretoria: Department of Education of South Africa.Google Scholar
  14. Department of Education. (2003). National Curriculum Statement. Grades 10–12. (General). Life Orientation. Pretoria: Department of Education, South Africa.Google Scholar
  15. Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelligences: The theory in practice. New York: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
  16. Garson, P. (2005). Education in South Africa. Retrieved on July 30, 2005, from http://www.southafrica.info/pls/procs/iac.page?p_tl = 690&p_t2 = 1823&p_t3 = 2717&p_t4 =o&p
  17. Haberman, M. (2004). Urban education: The State of Urban Schooling at the Start of the 21st Century. Milwaukee: University of Wisconsin. Retrieved on July 28, 2005, from http://www.educationnews.org/urban-education-the-state-o-furb.htm Google Scholar
  18. Hay, H. R., & Marais, F. (2004). Bridging programmes: Gain, pain or all in vain. South African Journal of Higher Education, 18 (2), 59–75.Google Scholar
  19. Human Rights Watch. (2001). Scared at school: Sexual violence against girls in South African schools. London: Human Rights Watch.Google Scholar
  20. Le Roux, J. (1993). The anti-child sentiment in contemporary society (with specific reference to the black child). In J. Le Roux (Ed.), The black child in crisis: A socio-educational perspective. (Vol. 1, pp. 49–79). Pretoria: Van Schaik.Google Scholar
  21. Luthuli, P. C. (1982). An introduction to black-oriented education in South Africa. Durban: Butterworths.Google Scholar
  22. Mangena, M. (2005). Address by Minister of Science and Technology, Mr. Mosibudi Mangena, at the launch of the ECD/Foundation Phase Science and Technology Week, and Certificate Awards, Alexandra.Google Scholar
  23. Mapesela, M. L. E. (2004). Academic staff satisfaction suffers due to increased learner access and redress. South African Journal of Higher Education, 18 (2), 265–277.Google Scholar
  24. Marais, F. (2002). Addressing the education needs of disadvantaged learners in open learning: A joint venture of higher and further education. Paper presented in the second Pan-Commonwealth Forum on Open Learning, Durban, South Africa.Google Scholar
  25. McCollum, S. (1997). Insights into the process of guiding reflection during an early field experience of pre-service teachers, Doctoral thesis. Virginia: Virginia Polytechnic and State University.Google Scholar
  26. Mitchell, C., De Lange, N, Moletsane, R., Stuart, J, & Buthelezi, T. (2005). Giving a face to HIV and AIDS: On the uses of photo-voice by teachers and community health care workers working with youth in rural South Africa. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 2, 257–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Mitchell, C., & Reid-Walsh, J. (2002). Researching children's popular culture: Cultural spaces of childhood. London: Routledge Taylor Francis.Google Scholar
  28. Miyeni, E. (2004). My Soweto. In A. Roberts, & J. Thloloe (Eds.), Soweto inside out: Stories about Africa's famous township (pp. 162–163). Johannesburg: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  29. Mona, V. (2005). South African Arts and Culture – Shebeens. Retrieved on July 28, 2005, from http://www.chico.mweb.co.za/mg/saarts/pop-shebeens/.htm
  30. Nhlengethwa, S. (2004). My Soweto. In A. Roberts, & J. Thloloe (Eds.), Soweto inside out: Stories about Africa's famous township (pp. 35–38). Johannesburg: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  31. Paquette, D., & Ryan, J. (2001). Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory. Retrieved on July 28, 2005, from http://www.academicdb.com/bronfenbrenner_s_ecological_systems_theory
  32. Paterson, A. (2005). Information systems and institutional mergers in South African higher education. South African Journal of Higher Education, 19 (1), 113–128.Google Scholar
  33. Sampson, A. (2004). Drum: The making of a magazine. Johannesburg: Jonathan Ball Publishers.Google Scholar
  34. Silver, R. (2005). Aggression and deppression assessed through art: Using draw-a-story to identify children and adolescents at risk. New York and Hove: Brunner-Routledge.Google Scholar
  35. Smith, M. E., & Le Roux, J. (1993). The anti-child sentiment in contemporary society (with specific reference to the black child). In J. Le Roux (Ed.), The black child in crisis: A socio-educational perspective. (Vol. 1, pp. 27–47). Pretoria: Van Schaik.Google Scholar
  36. South African Townships. (2005). Retrieved on July 27, 2005, from http://www6d.fi/starters/page.2005-06-22.3132406047
  37. Taylor, N., Muller, J., & Vinjevold, P. (2003). Getting schools working, research and systemic school reform in South Africa. Cape Town: Pearson Education Trust South Africa.Google Scholar
  38. Taylor, N., & Vinjevold, P. (Eds.). (1999). Getting learning right: Report of the President's Education Initiative Research Project. Johannesburg: Joint Education Trust.Google Scholar
  39. The Bantu Education Act, No 47 of 1953.Google Scholar
  40. The Group Areas Act, No 41 of 1950.Google Scholar
  41. The Extension of University Education Act, No 45 of 1959.Google Scholar
  42. The Natives (Black) Urban Areas Act, No 21 of 1923.Google Scholar
  43. Thloloe, J. (2004) My Soweto. In A. Roberts, & J. Thloloe (Eds.), Soweto inside out: Stories about Africa's famous township (pp. 21–34). Johannesburg: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  44. Tourism Kwazulz-Natal. (2005). Umlazi Township. Retrieved on September 18, 2005, from http://durban.kzn.org.za/durban/about/40.html.
  45. Van Greunen, E. (1993). The anti-child sentiment in contemporary society (with specific reference to the black child). In J. Le Roux (Ed.), The black child in crisis: A socio-educational perspective (Vol. 1, pp. 81–113). Pretoria: Van Schaik.Google Scholar
  46. Walker, R. (1993). Finding a silent voice for the researcher: Using photographs in evaluation and research. In M. Schratz (Ed.), Qualitative voices in educational research (pp. 74–92). London: Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  47. Weinstein, E., & Rosen, E. (2003). Teaching children about health. (2nd ed.). A multidisciplinary approach. Canada: Thomson Wadsworth.Google Scholar
  48. Wieder, A. (2003). Voices from Cape Town classrooms: Oral histories who fought apartheid. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thabisile Buthelezi
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KwaZulu-NatalDurban

Personalised recommendations