CRITERIA AND METHODOLOGY FOR DIAGNOSIS OF CORROSION OF STEEL REINFORCEMENTS IN RESTORED MONUMENTS

  • A. Moropoulou
  • G. Batis
  • M. Chronopoulos
  • A. Bakolas
  • E. Aggelakopoulou
  • E. Rakanta
  • K. Lambropoulos
  • E. Daflou

Abstract

In this work criteria and methodology are proposed for the diagnosis of the durability of steel reinforcement’s in restored monuments. An integrated methodology is applied for the assessment, of traditional buildings from several areas of Greece, such as Rhodes (Kallithea Spa), Chios (Nea Moni Monastery) and Symi (The Bell Tower of St. John Prodromos). Non-destructive techniques were applied in situ (Fiber Optics Microscopy, Infrared Thermography, ultrasound technique, determination of reinforce corrosion potential, concrete specific electrical resistance and concrete carbonation depth) along with Destructive Techniques in laboratory (Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry, X-Ray Diffraction, Thermal Analysis, Determination of soluble salts. The applied methodology allows the assessment of the conservation interventions, and concludes for their effectiveness. Proper actions are proposed either for preservation of the restored monuments or for the restoration where it is needed. The marine atmosphere in all three cases has caused corrosion to the reinforcements. The results show that the conservation interventions in all cases are improper and actions must be taken in order to reverse the corrosion phenomena and to preserve the historic character of the monuments. Compatible restoration innervations are proposed in order to diminish the corrosion and keep the durability of the buildings examined, as well as to avoid the decay of the original materials.

Keywords

Titanium Porosity Quartz Hydrate Mercury 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Moropoulou
    • 1
  • G. Batis
    • 1
  • M. Chronopoulos
    • 1
  • A. Bakolas
    • 1
  • E. Aggelakopoulou
    • 1
  • E. Rakanta
    • 1
  • K. Lambropoulos
    • 1
  • E. Daflou
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering SectionNational Technical University of AthensZografou CampousAthens

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