Advertisement

Introducing the Study

  • Penny J. Gilmer
Chapter

Abstract

The purpose of this book is threefold. Firstly, I examine the methodologies that other researchers use to study college-level classes for enhanced learning using technology and collaborative strategies. Secondly, I share my learning from an action research study I conducted in my undergraduate-level General Biochemistry I class. The impetus for this study was my goal of becoming a better teacher. Thirdly, I put forth ideas for other college faculty, who are grappling with improving the learning environment in their science classrooms, and who may identify with my experiences and learn from my action research study.

Keywords

Science Education African American Student Critical Thinking Skill Science Education Research Cultural Historical Activity Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Adamson SL, Banks D, Burtch M, Cox F III, Judson E, Turley JB et al (2003) Reformed undergraduate instruction and its subsequent impact on secondary school teaching practice and student achievement. J Res Sci Teach 40(10):939-957CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bourdieu P (1991) Language and symbolic power (ed: Thompson JB). Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MAGoogle Scholar
  3. Britzman DP (1991) Practice makes practice: a critical study of learning to teach. State University of New York Press, Albany, NYGoogle Scholar
  4. Bruffee KA (1993) Collaborative learning: higher education, interdependence, and the authority of knowledge. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MDGoogle Scholar
  5. Bruner J (1986) Actual minds, possible worlds. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MAGoogle Scholar
  6. Denzin NK, Lincoln YS (eds) (1994) Handbook of qualitative research. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CAGoogle Scholar
  7. Djerassi C (2000, February) Contraception vs. conception - a millennial prognosis. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  8. Druger M (2002) Teaching the introductory college science course: a career specialty. J Coll Sci Teach 32:148-149Google Scholar
  9. Ellis C (1997) Evocative autoethnography: writing emotionally about our lives. In: Tierney WG, Lincoln YS (eds) Representation and the text: re-framing the narrative voice. State University of New York Press, Albany, NY, pp 115-139Google Scholar
  10. Gergen MM, Gergen NK (2000) Qualitative inquiry: tensions and transformations. In: Denzin NK, Lincoln YS (eds) Handbook of qualitative research, 2nd edn. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp 1025-1046Google Scholar
  11. Gilmer PJ (2002) Opalescence at the triple point: teaching, research, and service. In: Taylor PC, Gilmer PJ, Tobin K (eds) Transforming undergraduate science education: social constructivist perspectives. Peter Lang, New York, pp 423-462Google Scholar
  12. Gilmer PJ (2004) Transforming university biochemistry teaching through action research: utilizing collaborative learning and teaching. Unpublished doctoral thesis. Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia.Google Scholar
  13. Glasersfeld E von (1989) Cognition, construction of knowledge, and teaching. Synthese 80:121-140. [reprinted in 1998, In Matthews MR (ed) Constructivism in science education: a philosophical examination. Kluwer, Boston, MA, pp. 11-30]Google Scholar
  14. Grenfeld M, James D (1998) Bourdieu and education: acts of practical theory. Falmer, Bristol, PAGoogle Scholar
  15. Guba EG, Lincoln YS (1989) Fourth generation evaluation. Sage, Newbury Park, CAGoogle Scholar
  16. Janesick VJ (2000) The choreography of qualitative research design: minuets, improvisations, and crystallization. In: Denzin NK, Lincoln YS (eds) Handbook of qualitative research, 2nd edn. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp 379-400Google Scholar
  17. Lather P (1986) Research as praxis. Harv Educ Rev 56(3):257-277Google Scholar
  18. Leonard WH (2000) How do college students best learn science? An assessment of popular teaching styles and their effectiveness. J Coll Sci Teach 29(6):385-388Google Scholar
  19. Levi P (1984) The periodic table. Schocken Books, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  20. Lincoln YS, Denzin NK (2000) The seventh moment: out of the past. In: Denzin NK, Lincoln YS (eds) Handbook of qualitative research, 2nd edn. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp 1047-1065Google Scholar
  21. Lincoln YS, Guba EG (2000) Paradigmatic controversies, contradictions, and emerging confluences. In: Denzin NK, Lincoln YS (eds) Handbook of qualitative research, 2nd edn. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp 163-188Google Scholar
  22. Mattson S (2002) What it means to achieve: negotiating assessment in a biology course. In: Taylor PC, Gilmer PJ, Tobin K (eds) Transforming undergraduate science teaching: social constructivist perspectives. Peter Lang, New York, pp 245-274Google Scholar
  23. Nobel Prize (1980) The Nobel Prize Internet archive (Chemistry). http://www.nobelprizes.com/nobel/nobel.html. Accessed 31 Aug 2003
  24. Paul R, Elder L (2007) Miniature guide to critical thinking: concepts and tools. Foundation for Critical Thinking, Dillon Beach, CAGoogle Scholar
  25. Richardson L (1994) Writing: a method of inquiry. In: Denzin NK, Lincoln YS (eds) Handbook of qualitative research. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp 516-529Google Scholar
  26. Sienko MJ, Plane RA (1961) Chemistry, 2nd edn. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New YorkGoogle Scholar
  27. Swidler A (1986) Culture in action: symbols and strategies. Am Sociol Rev 51:273-286CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Tobias S (1990) They’re not dumb, they’re different: stalking the second tier. Research Corporation, Tucson, AZGoogle Scholar
  29. Wright EL, Sunal DW, Day JB (2004) Improving undergraduate science teaching through educational research. In: Sunal DW, Wright EL, Day JB (eds) Reform in undergraduate science teaching for the 21st century. Information Age, Greenwich, CT, pp 1-11Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Penny J. Gilmer
    • 1
  1. 1.Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

Personalised recommendations