How Does Educational Decentralization Work and What Has it Achieved?

  • Holger Daun

Keywords

Community Participation National Curriculum Charter School School Improvement School Choice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abu-Duhou, I. (1999). School-based management. Paris: Unesco/IIEP.Google Scholar
  2. Alternative Sud (1997). Editorial: Pouvoirs locaux. Alternative Sud, IV (3): 5–23.Google Scholar
  3. Angus, J. (1994). Democratic Participation or Efficient Site Management: The School and Political Location of the Self-Managing School, (pp. 11–33). In J. Smyth (ed.). A Socially Critical View of the Self-Managing School. London: The Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  4. Arnove, R. F. (1999). Reframing Comparative Education: The Dialectic of the Global and the Local. In R. F. Arnove, R. F. & C. A. Torres (eds). Comparative Education. The Dialectic of the Global and the Local, (pp. 1–24). Boulder: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.Google Scholar
  5. Arnove, R., Franz, S., Mollis, M. and Torres, C. A. (1999). Education in Latin America at the End of the 1990s. In R. F. Arnove, R. F. & C. A. Torres (eds). Comparative Education. The Dialectic of the Global and the Local, (pp. 305–328). Boulder: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.Google Scholar
  6. Arnstein, S. R. (1971). A ladder of citizen participation. Journal of the Royal Town Planning Institute. http://www.aiatsis.gov/au/rsrch/ntru/ifamp/pratice/pdfs/Arstein. Retrieved August 14, 2004.
  7. Arsen, D. L., Plank, D. and Sykes, G. (2000). School Choice in Michigan: The Rules Matter. Lansing: Michigan State University;.Google Scholar
  8. Barro, S.M. (1996). How Countries Pay for Schools. An International Comparison of System for Financing Primary and Secondary Education. Paper prepared for the Center of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE), University of Wisconsin;.Google Scholar
  9. Beare, H. (1993). Different Ways of Viewing School-site Councils: Whose Paradigm Is in the Use Here? In H. Beare and W.L. Boyd (eds.). Restructuring Schools. An International Perspective on the Movement to Transform the Control and Performance of School, (pp. 200–217). London: The Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  10. Beare, H. and Boyd, W. L. (1993). Introduction. In H. Beare and W.L. Boyd (eds.). Restructuring Schools. An International Perspective on the Movement to Transform the Control and Performance of School, (pp. 3–11). London: The Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  11. Blackmore, J. (2000). Globalization: A Useful Concept for Feminists Rethinking Theory and Strategies in Education? In N. Burbules & C. A. Torres (eds.).Globalization and education. Critical Perspectives, (pp. 133–155). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Boakari, M. F. (2004). Learning for Change: Lessons from Rural Community Participation. Paper presented at the annual conference organized by Comparative and International Education Society, March 9–12, in Salt Lake City, the USA.Google Scholar
  13. Bolivia–Sida (2000). Popular Participation, Decentralization and Education in Bolivia. Paper presented at a seminar organized by the Swedish Development Cooperation Authority, October 13, 2000, in Stockholm.Google Scholar
  14. Bray, M. (1997). Community Financing of Education: Rationales, Mechanisms, and Policy Implications in Less Developed Countries. In C. Colclough (ed.). Marketizing Education and Health in Developing Countries: Miracle or Mirage? , (pp. 185–201) Oxford: Clanderon Press.Google Scholar
  15. Bray, M. (1998). Financing Education in Developing Asia: Patterns, Trends and Policy Implications. Hongkong: Asian Development Bank/The University of Hongkong.Google Scholar
  16. Caldwell, J. B. (1993). Paradox and Uncertainty in the Governance of Education. In H. Beare and W.L. Boyd (eds.). Restructuring Schools. An International Perspective on the Movement to Transform the Control and Performance of School, (pp. 158–173). London: The Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  17. Castillo, J. B. (2002).Descentralización del estado y articulación del espacio nacional. El Caso de la Región Sur del Ecuador. Third edition. Quito: Libre Mundi.Google Scholar
  18. Codd, J. A. (1994). Managerialism, Market Liberalism, and the Move to Self-Managing Schools in New Zealand. In J. Smyth (ed.). A Socially Critical View of the Self-Managing School, (pp. 153–170). London: The Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  19. Crossley, M. and Watson, K. (2003). Comparative and International Research in Education. Globalisation, context and difference. London & New York: RoutledgeFalmer.Google Scholar
  20. Dale, R. (1997). The State and the Governance of Education: An Analysis of the Restructuring of the State-Education Relationship. In A. H. Halsey, H. Lauder, P. Brown, and A. Stuart Wells (eds). Education. Culture, Economy, Society, (pp. 273–298). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Dale, R. (1999). Specifying globalization effects on national policy: a focus on the mechanisms. Journal of Education Policy, 14 (1):1–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Dale, R. (2000). Globalization and education: Demonstrating a “common world educational culture” or locating a “globally structured educational agenda”? Educational Theory, 40 (4): 427–428.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Daresh, J. C. (1998). Professional development for school leadership: The impact of U. S. educational reform. International Journal of Educational Research, 29: 299–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Daun, H. (2003). Market Forces and Decentralization in Sweden–a Threat to Comprehensiveness and Equity and an Impetus for School Development? In D. N. Plank & G. Sykes (eds.). Choosing Choice. School Choice in International Perspective, (pp. 92–111). New York and London: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  25. Daun, H. (2004). Privatization, Decentralization and Governance in Education in the Chech Republic, England, France. Germany and Sweden. International Review of Education, 50: 325–346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Daun, H. & R. Arjmand (forthc. 2006). Education in Europe and Muslim Demands for Competitive and Moral Education. International Review of Education, 2006.Google Scholar
  27. Daun, H. & Sapatoru, D. (2002). Educational Reforms in Eastern Europe: Shifts, Innovations and Restoration. In H. Daun (ed). Educational Restructuring in the Context of Globalization and Local Demands, (pp. 147–179). New York: Garland Publishing.Google Scholar
  28. Daun, H., Slenning, K. & Waldow, F. (2004). Sweden. In E. Klieme (ed.). Educational Standards in Some OECD Countries, (pp. 115–145). Münster: Waxman.Google Scholar
  29. Diallo, A. S. (2004). Community Participation in Education for Equity and Quality I. Paper presented at the annual conference organized by Comparative and International Education Society, March 9–12, in Salt Lake City, USA.Google Scholar
  30. Durston, S. & Nashire, N. (1998). Community Participation in Education: Policies, Practices and Real Lives. Paper presented at the conference organized by the World Comparative Education Societies, in Cape Town, July 1998.Google Scholar
  31. Elmore, R.F. (1993). School Decentralization: Who Gains? Who Looses. In J. Hannawy and M. Carnoy (eds.). Decentralization and School Improvement. Can We Fulfill the Promise?, (pp. 33–54). San Fransisco: The Jossey-Bass Publications.Google Scholar
  32. Esteva, G. and Prakash, M. S. (1998) Grassroots Postmodernism. Rewaking the Soil of Cultures, London: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  33. Ethiopia-Sida (2001). Decentralisation in Education–Ethiopia Paper presented at a seminar organized by the Swedish Development Cooperation Authority, in Stockholm, October 13, 2000.Google Scholar
  34. Eurydice (2003). http://www.eurydice.org/Eurybase/Applic. Retrieved November 15, 2003.
  35. Fine (1993). (Ap) parent Involvement: Reflections on Parents, Power and Urban Public Schools. Teachers College Record, 94, reprinted in A. H. Halsey, H. Lauder, P. Brown, and A. Stuart Wells (eds). Education. Culture, Economy, Society, (pp. 460–475). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Fiske, E. B. (1996). Decentralization of Education: Politics and Consensus. Washington: The World Bank.Google Scholar
  37. Fiske , E. B. & Ladd, H. F. (2003). School Choice in New Zealand: A Cautionary Tale. In D. N. Plank & G. Sykes (eds.).Choosing Choice. School Choice in International Perspective, (pp. 45–66). New York and London: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  38. Fofana, B. (2004). Community Participation in Education as a Catalyst for a Free Society, II. Paper presented at the annual conference organized by Comparative and International Education Society, March 9–12, in Salt Lake City, the USA.Google Scholar
  39. Garnier , M. (2004). Community Participation in Education as a Catalyst for a Free Society, III. Paper presented at the annual conference organized by Comparative and International Education Society, March 9–12, in Salt Lake City, the USA.Google Scholar
  40. Gaziel, H. (1998). School-Based Management as a Factor in School Effectiveness. International Review of Education, 44 (4): 319–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Gilbert, N. (2004). Transformation of the Welfare State: The Silent Surrender of the Public Responsibility. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  42. Grace, G. (1997). Politics, Markets and Democratic Schools: On the Transformation of School Leadership. In A. H. Halsey, H. Lauder, P. Brown, and A. Stuart Wells (eds). Education. Culture, Economy, Society (pp. 311–319). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  43. Gurr, D. (1999). From supervision to quality assurance: the case of the State of Victoria (Australia). Paris: IIEP/Unesco.Google Scholar
  44. Hamidou, M. (1997). Décentrer ou decentraliser: un dilemme au Mali. Alternative Sud, IV, 3: 148–158.Google Scholar
  45. Hamilton, L. (2003). Assessment as a Policy tool. Review of Research in Education, 27: 25–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Hammouda, H. B. (1997). Vers une nouvelle problématique du savoir sur le développement. Alternative Sud, IV, 3: 25–36.Google Scholar
  47. Hannaway, J. (1993). Decentralization in Two School Districts: Challenging the Standard Paradigm. In J. Hannaway and M. Carnoy (eds.).Decentralization and School Improvement. Can We Fulfill the Promise?, (pp. 135–162). San Fransisco: The Jossey-Bass Publishers.Google Scholar
  48. Hannaway, J. & Woodroffe, N. (2003). Policy Instruments in Education. Review of Research in Education, 27: 1–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Hanson, E.M. (1990). School-based Managemen and Educational Reform in he United Sates and Spain. Comparative Education Review, 34 (4): 523–537.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Hanson, E.M. (1995). Democratization and Decentralization in Colombian Education. Comparative Education Review, 39 (1): 101–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Hanson, E. M. (2001). Democratization and Educational Decentralization in Spain: A Twenty Year Struggle for Reform. Education Reform and Management Publication Series, 1 (3).Google Scholar
  52. Harold, B. (1998). “Head”-ing into the future: The changing role of New Zealand´s principals. International Journal of Educational Research, 29: 299–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Hawkins, J. N. (2000). Centralization, decentralization, recentralization. Educational reform in China. Journal of Educational Administration, 38, (5): 442–454.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Henig, J.R. (1993). Rethinking School Choice. Limits of the Market Metaphor. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  55. Hudson, C. & Lidström, A. (2001). National School Policy Changes in Britain and Sweden. In C. Hudson. & A. Lidström (eds.).Local Education Policies. Comparing Sweden and Britain, (pp. 27–64). Basingstoke: Palgrave.Google Scholar
  56. ILO (1996). Impact of structural adjustment on the employment and training of teachers. Geneva: ILO, Sectoral Activities Programme.Google Scholar
  57. Inglehart, R. (1997).Modernization and Postmodernization. Cultural, Economic and Political Changes in 43 Countries. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  58. Jayal, N. G. & Pai, S. (2001). Introduction. In N. G. Jayal & S. Pai (eds.). Democratic Governance in India. Challenges of Poverty, Development and Identity, (pp. 11–31). New Delhi: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  59. Johnson, N (1987). The Welfare State in Transition. Brighton: Wheatsheaf Books.Google Scholar
  60. Kanaev, A. and Daun, H. (2002). Nationalism and Educational Transition in Central Asia. In H. Daun (ed.).Educational Restructuring in the Context of Globalization and National Policy, (pp. 227–244). New York: RoutledgeFalmer.Google Scholar
  61. Kemmerer, F. (1994). Decentralization of Schooling in Developing Nations. In T. Husén & N. Postleithwaite (eds). International Encyclopedia of Education, (pp. 1412–1416). Oxford: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  62. Kitaev, I. (1999). Private education in sub-Saharan Africa: a re-examination of theories and concepts related to its development and finance. Paris: Unesco–International Institute for Educational Planning.Google Scholar
  63. Ladd, H. F. (2003). Introduction. In D. N. Plank & G. Sykes (eds.). Choosing Choice. School Choice in International Perspective (pp. 1–23). New York and London: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  64. Lareau, A. (1987). Social-Class Differences in Family-School Relationship: The Importance of Cultural Capital. Sociology of Education, 60: 73–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Leclercq, F. (2003). Decentralisation and Quality of Teaching: A Field Study of Primary Schools in Madhya Pradesh, India. Paper presented at the Paper presented at the conference organized by United Kingdom Forum for International Education and Training, in Oxford, England, September 9–12, 2003.Google Scholar
  66. Levacic, R. (1995). Local Management of Schools. Analysis and Practice. Buckingham: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  67. McGinn, N. and L. Pereira (1992). Why States Change the Governance of Education: an historical comparison of Brazil and the United States. Comparative Education Review, 28 (2): 167–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Midgley, J. (1986). Community Participation: History, Concepts and Controversies. In J. Midgley (ed). Community Participation, Social Development and the State, (pp. 13–47). London: Methuen.Google Scholar
  69. Mmbaga, D. R. (2002). The Inclusive Classroom in Tanzania. Dream or Reality? Stockholm: Institute of International Education.Google Scholar
  70. Mohannan, B. (1997). La décentralisation en Inde. Alternative Sud, IV (3): 61–73.Google Scholar
  71. Muta, H. (2000). Deregulation and decentralization of education in Japan. Journal of Educational Administration, 38 (5): 455–470.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Naidoo, J. (2005). Education Decentralization in Africa: Great Expectations and Unfulfilled Promises. In D. P. Baker & A. W. Wiseman (eds.). Global Trends in Educational Policy. Vol 6: International Perspectives on Education and Society, (pp. 99–124). New York: Elsevier.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Norris, P. & Inglehart, R. (2004). Sacred and Secular. Religion and Politics Worldwide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  74. Odden, A. and P. Wohlstetter (1993). Strategies for Making School-Based Management Work. Consortium for Policy Research (CPRE), (pp. 6–10). New Brunswick.Google Scholar
  75. OECD (1995a).Participatory Development and Good Governance. Paris: OECD.Google Scholar
  76. OECD (1995b). Decision-making in 14 OECD Education Systems. Paris: OECD/CERI.Google Scholar
  77. Ornelas, C. (2000). The politics of the educational decentralization in Mexico. Journal of Educational Administration, 38 (5): 426–441.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Ornelas, C. (2004). Decentralization in Mexico. Paper presented at the annual conference organized by Comparative and International Education Society, March 9–12, in Salt Lake City, the USA.Google Scholar
  79. Papagiannis, G.J., P.A. Easton & Owens, J. T. (1992). The School Restructuring Movement in the USA: an analysis of major issues and policy implications. Paris: Unesco.Google Scholar
  80. Patrinos, H. A. & Lakshmanan, A. (1997).Decentralization of Education, Demand-Side Financing. Washington: World Bank.Google Scholar
  81. Pierre, J. (2000). Introduction: Understanding Governance. In J. Pierre (ed.). Debating Governance, (pp. 1–12). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  82. Power, S. & Whitty, G. (1997). Managing the State and the Market: ´New´ Education Management in Five Countries. British Journal of Educational Studies, 45 (4): 342–362.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Pryor, J. (2003). ´Community´ Participation in Rural Schooling: a case study from Ghana. Paper presented at the conference organized by United Kingdom Forum for International Education and Training, in Oxford, England, September 9–12, 2003.Google Scholar
  84. Reimers, F. & Tiburcio, L. (1993). Education, Adjustment and Reconstruction: Options for Change. A Unesco Discussion Paper. Paris: Unesco.Google Scholar
  85. Riley, K. och D. Rawles (1997). Inspection and School Improvement in England and Wales. In T. Townsend (ed.). Restructuring and Quality: Issues for Tomorrow´s Schools. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  86. Robertson, J. M. (1998). From Managing in question to leadership perspectives. International Journal of Education Research, 29: 359–370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Rock Kane, P. and Lauricella, C. J. (2001). Assessing the Growth and Potential of Charter Schools. In H. M. Levin (ed.). Privatizing Education. Can Marketplace Deliver Choice, Efficiency, Equity and Social Cohesion? (pp. 203–233). Boulder: Westview Press.Google Scholar
  88. Ruiz de Forsberg, N. (2003).School Community Voices: Implementation of the Autonomous School Program in Nicaragua. Stockholm: Institute of International Education.Google Scholar
  89. Samoff, J. (1999). Institutionalizing International Influence. In R. F. Arnove, R. F. & C. A. Torres (eds). Comparative Education. The Dialectic of the Global and the Local, (pp. 51–89). Boulder: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.Google Scholar
  90. Santos Filho dos, C.J. (1993). The Recent Process of Decentralization and Democratic Management of Education in Brazil. International Review of Education, 39 (5).Google Scholar
  91. Sayed, Y. (2002). Democratising Education in a Decentralized System: South African Policy and Practice. Compare, 32 (1): 35–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Schneider, H. (1997). Participatory Governance: The Missing Link for Poverty Reduction. Policy Brief No. 17. Paris: OECD.Google Scholar
  93. Shaeffer, S. (1994). Participation for Educational Change: A Synthesis of Experience. UNESCO. Paris.Google Scholar
  94. Siddique, N. A. (1997). Théories de la d´centralisation de l´État. Alternative Sud, IV (3): 23–40.Google Scholar
  95. Skolverket (1999). Nationella kvalitetsgranskningen 1998. (The National Quality Assessment 1998). Stockholm: National Agency for Education.Google Scholar
  96. Skolverket (2000). Nationella kvalitetsgranskningen 2000. (The National Quality Assessment 2000) Stockholm: The National Agency for Education.Google Scholar
  97. Skolverket (2001a). Fem år av försöksverksamhet med lokala styrelser med föräldramajoritet. (Five years of experimentation with local boards with parental majority). Dnr 2000:615. Stockholm: National Agency for Education.Google Scholar
  98. Skolverket (2001b). Attityder till skolan 2000. (Attitudes towards school). Stockholm: The National Agency for Education.Google Scholar
  99. Skolverket (2003). SIRIS, SALSA: http://salsa.artisan.se. Retrieved November 15, 2003.
  100. Slater, R.O. (1993). On centralization, decentralization and school restructuring: A sociological perspective. In H. Beare and W.L. Boyd (eds.). Restructuring Schools. An International Perspective on the Movement to Transform the Control and Performance of School, (pp. 174–183). London: The Falmer.Google Scholar
  101. Southworth, G. (1998). Change and continuity in the work of primary headteachers in England. International Journal of Educational Research, 29: 311–321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  102. Tikly, L. (1998). Redefining Community Involvement in the Finance and Governance of Education in Developing Countries: A New Role for Local Governance. Paper presented at the conference organized by the World Comparative Education Societies, July 12–17, in Cape Town, South Africa.Google Scholar
  103. Tsang, M. D. (2003). School Choice in the People´s Republic of China. In D. N. Plank & G. Sykes (eds.).Choosing Choice. School Choice in International Perspective, (pp. 164–195). New York and London: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  104. Vynnycky, C. (2004). Obligatorisk grunnskoleopplaering i Sverige, utenor skolen och hjemmmebasert–tegn på forandring? (Compulsory basic education in Sweden, outside the school or home-based–signs of change). In C. Beck & M. Straume (eds.).Hjemmeundervisning–starten på en ny utdanningsrevolusjon? (pp. 67–92). Vallset: Oplandske Bokforlag.Google Scholar
  105. Weiler, H. N. (1993). Control Versus Legitimation: The Politics of Ambivalence. In J. Hannaway and M. Carnoy (eds.).Decentralization and School Improvement. Can We Fulfill the Promise?, (pp. 55–83). San Fransisco: The Jossey-Bass Publishers.Google Scholar
  106. Weindling, D. (1998). Reform, restructuring, role and other “R” words: The effects of headteachers in England and Wales. International Journal of Educational Research, 29: 299–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  107. Wells, A. S. and Scott, J. (2001). Privatization and Charter School Reform: Ecnomic, Political and Soäcial Dimensions. In H. M. Levin (ed.). Privatizing Education. Can Marketplace Deliver Choice, Efficiency, Equity and Social Cohesion? (pp. 234–259). Boulder: Westview Press.Google Scholar
  108. Welsh, T. & McGinn, N. F. (1999). Decentralization of education: why, when, what and how? Paris: IIEP/Unesco.Google Scholar
  109. Whitty, G. (1996). Creating Quasi-Markets in Education: A Review of Recent Research on Parental Choice and School Autonomy in Three Countries. Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, 8 (1).Google Scholar
  110. Whitty, G. (1997). Marketization, the State and the Re-formation of the Teaching Profession. In A. H. Halsey, H. Lauder, P. Brown, and A. Stuart Wells (eds). Education. Culture, Economy, Society (pp. 299–310). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  111. Wieringen, F. van (1997). School Autonomy: A Framework for European Comparison. In S. Lawton, R. Read & F. Wieringen (eds.).Restructuring Public Schooling: Europe, Canada, America, (pp. 59–74). New York: Waxman.Google Scholar
  112. Wilson, R.A. (1997). Human Rights, Culture and Context: An Introduction. In R. A. Wilson (ed.). Human Rights, Culture and Context. Anthropological Perspectives, (pp. 1–27). London: Pluto Press.Google Scholar
  113. Winkler, D.R. (1993). Fiscal Decentralization and Accountability in Education: Experiences in Four Countries. In J. Hannaway and M. Carnoy (eds.).Decentralization and School Improvement. Can We Fulfill the Promise? (pp. 102–134). San Fransisco: The Jossey-Bass Publishers.Google Scholar
  114. Wylie, C. (1995). School-site Management–Some Lessons from New Zealand. Paper given at the annual AERA meeting, San Fransico, United States, 18–21 April, 1995.Google Scholar
  115. Zhenyao, W. (1997). L´autonomie villageoise en Chine: état présent et prospective. Alternative Sud, IV, 3: 102–134.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Holger Daun

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations