Regional Paths to Fertility Transition

  • Pat Caldwell

Abstract

In recent years there has been an enormous increase in our ability to undertake a meaningful analysis on a global scale of regional paths to fertility transition. Generalizations can be made not only because most countries in the world are now participating in the transition, but also because enough sub-Saharan African countries have at last joined the transition to allow us to hazard hypotheses about the conditions of onset of fertility decline there too.

Keywords

Europe Turkey Egypt Argentina Indonesia 

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  • Pat Caldwell

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