Maternal Coresidence and Contact: Evidence from Cross-National Surveys

  • Judith Treas
  • Philip N. Cohen
Part of the International Studies In Population book series (ISIP, volume 3)

Since families provide a safety net that compensates for the limitations of public support systems, family exchanges between the generations remain an integral component of wellbeing, even in the mature welfare states of the developed world. Finding the right balance of state and family transfers constitutes a central issue for public policy. As they confront ageing populations, nations come under increased pressure to reconcile contradictory goals. They are urged to do more to help beleaguered families care for their dependents, to hold the line against rising welfare and social service costs, and to guard against permitting public transfers to undermine private assistance. Although most developed countries confront this public policy challenge, they come to the intergenerational transfer debate constrained by their unique cultural traditions, by their distinctive histories of public welfare, and by their different demographic age structures. Comparative and cross-national studies enrich our understanding of these demographic and welfare contexts (Hantrais and Letablier 1996). Although cross-national estimates and comparisons of public intergenerational transfers are easy to come by, more knowledge is needed about the private support that flows between younger and older family members in different societies.

Keywords

Migration Europe Income Boulder 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith Treas
    • 1
  • Philip N. Cohen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CaliforniaUSA
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of North CaliforniaUSA

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