Drivers for Changes in the Coastal Zone

  • Tetsuo Yanagi
  • Kwangwoo Cho
Part of the Coastal Systems and Continental Margins book series (CSCM, volume 11)

The land area of this region is characterized by rain forests, paddy fields, and countless islands, while the coastal area is characterized by its bio-geomorphology such as mangrove forests and coral reefs. Numerous large and small islands subdivide the region into different seas, which are connected with each other by a large number of passages and channels. Deep trenches, high mountain chains, many volcanoes, deep sea basins, and innumerable coral islands form a complexity of phenomena that are not found over such an extended area in any other part of the world.

Keywords

Zinc Petroleum Cadmium Income Sedimentation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tetsuo Yanagi
    • 1
  • Kwangwoo Cho
  1. 1.Research Institute for Applied MechanicsKyushu UniversityFukuoka prefectureJapan

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