Advertisement

Modern Interface Methods for Semiconductor Process Simulation

  • J. A. Sethian

Abstract

The manufacture of semiconductor devices may include dozens of process steps, all delicately choreographed to produce a functioning, reliable, and efficient device. These steps, such as photolitography, etching and deposition, act to shape and mold the device, replete with various metals, insulators, and interconnects. As one might guess, a trial and error approach to determine a repeatable and reliable recipe is not inexpensive. Numerical simulations which capture the essential details of these processes have a valuable role to play.

Keywords

Topological Change Sharp Corner Jacobi Formulation Signed Distance Function Interface Propagation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    J. Sethian, Level Set Methods and Fast Marching Methods, 2nd edn. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999.MATHGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    S. Osher and J. Sethian, “Fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speeds: algorithms based on Hamilton-Jacobi formulations,” J. Comput. Phys., 79, 12–49, 1988.MATHCrossRefMathSciNetADSGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    J. Sethian, “Curvature and the evolution of fronts,” Commun. Math. Phys., 101, 489–499, 1985.CrossRefMathSciNetADSGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    J. Sethian, “Numerical methods for propagating fronts,” In: P. Concus and R. Finn (eds.), Variational Methods for Free Surface Interfaces, Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 66–80, 1987.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    D. Adalsteinsson and J. Sethian, “A fast level set method for propagating interfaces,” J. Comput. Phys., 118, 269–277, 1995.MATHCrossRefMathSciNetADSGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    D. Chopp, “Computing minimal surfaces via level set curvature flow,” J. Comput. Phys., 106, 77–91, 1993.MATHCrossRefMathSciNetADSGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    D. Adalsteinsson and J. Sethian, “The fast construction of extension velocities in level set methods,” J. Comput. Phys., 148, 2–22, 1999.MATHCrossRefMathSciNetADSGoogle Scholar
  8. [8]
    J. Sethian, “Fastmarching methods,” SIAM Rev., 41, 2–22, 1999.CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    D. Adalsteinsson and J. Sethian, “A unified level set approach to etching, deposition and lithography. I. Algorithms and two-dimensional simulations,” J. Comput. Phys., 120, 128–144, 1995.MATHCrossRefMathSciNetADSGoogle Scholar
  10. [10]
    D. Adalsteinsson and J. Sethian, “A unified level set approach to etching, deposition and lithography. II. Three-dimensional simulations,” J. Comput. Phys., 122, 348–366, 1995.MATHCrossRefMathSciNetADSGoogle Scholar
  11. [11]
    D. Adalsteinsson and J. Sethian, “A unified level set approach to etching, deposition and lithography. III. Complex simulations and multiple effects,” J. Comput. Phys., 138, 193–223, 1997.MATHCrossRefMathSciNetADSGoogle Scholar
  12. [12]
    J. Sethian and D. Adalsteinsson, “An overview of level set methods for etching, deposition, and lithography development,” IEEE Trans. Semiconductor Devices, 10, 167–184, 1996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Sethian
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

Personalised recommendations