Creativity as Research Practice in the Visual Arts

  • Graeme Sullivan
Part of the Springer International Handbook of Research in Arts Education book series (SIHE, volume 16)

Keywords

Editing Harness Neon Iraq 

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References

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Swedish Questions about Creativity in Visual Arts

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graeme Sullivan
    • 1
  1. 1.Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityU.S.A.

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