The Teaching of English Language Arts as Poetic Language: An Institutionalist View

  • Alyson Whyte
Part of the Springer International Handbook of Research in Arts Education book series (SIHE, volume 16)

Keywords

Depression Coherence Beach Refraction Alan 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alyson Whyte
    • 1
  1. 1.Auburn UniversityU.S.A.

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