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British Journal Multicultural Education Musical Performance Musical Activity Music Education 
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Social Issues: Multicultural Music Education in Taiwan

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Social Issues on Music Education

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bengt Olsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Göteborg UniversitySweden

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