Advertisement

Artists in the Academy: Curriculum and Instruction

  • Eve Harwood
Part of the Springer International Handbook of Research in Arts Education book series (SIHE, volume 16)

Keywords

High Education Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation Dissertation Abstract American High Education Music Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alexander, B. (2002). Intimate engagement: student performances as scholarly endeavor. Theatre Topics, 12 (1), 85–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Alexander, C. (1997). Relationships between community music programs and their affiliated collegiate music schools. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Peabody College for Teachers of Vanderbilt University.Google Scholar
  3. Anthony, K. (1991). Design juries on trial: the renaissance of the design studio. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.Google Scholar
  4. Atlas, G., Taggart, T., & Goodell, D. (2004). The effects of sensitivity to criticism on motivation and performance in music students. British Journal of Music Education, 21 (1), 81–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Barnes, J., Project Director. (1999). Making music work: professional integration project; fostering professional skills among those studying music in higher education. London, UK: Royal College of Music.Google Scholar
  6. Barrett, T. (1988). A comparison of the goals of studio professors conducting critiques and art education goals for teaching criticism. Studies in art education, 30 (Fall), 22–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Barrett, T. (2000). Studio critiques of student art: As they are, as they could be with mentoring. Theory into Practice, 39 (1), 28–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Barrett, T. (2004). Investigating art criticism in education: An autobiographical narrative. In E. Eisner & M. Day (Eds.), Handbook of research and policy in art education (pp. 725–749). Mahweh, NJ: National Art Education Association: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  9. Beck, J., & Appel, M. (2003). Shaping the future of postsecondary dance education through service learning: An introductory examination of the ArtsBridge model. Research in dance education, 4 (2), 103–125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Bekkala, E. (2001). The development of artists at Rhode Island School of Design. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Columbia University Teachers College.Google Scholar
  11. Bell, E. (1996). American musical theater songs in the undergraduate vocal studio: A survey of current practice, guidelines for repertoire selection, and pedagogical analyses of selected songs. Dissertation Abstracts International, A57/06 p. 2406.Google Scholar
  12. Berkeley, A. (2004). Changing views of knowledge and the struggle for undergraduate theatre curriculum, 1900–1980. In A. Fliotsos & G. Medford (Eds.), Teaching theatre today: Pedagogical views of theatre in higher education (pp. 7–30). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  13. Bracey, L. (2004). Voicing connections: An interpretive study of university dancers’ experiences. Research in Dance Education, 5 (1), 7–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Burgoyne, S., Poulin, K., & Reardon, A. (1999). The impact of acting on student actors: boundary blurring, growth, and emotional distress. Theatre Topics, 9 (2), 157–179.Google Scholar
  15. Butterworth, J. (2004). Teaching choreography in higher education: A process continuum mode. Research in Dance Education, 5 (1), 45–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Callaway, P. (2001). The use of computer-generated spectrographic analysis of female voices in the college voice studio. Dissertation Abstracts International, A63/01, p.19.Google Scholar
  17. Cassidy, G. N. (2002). Distance education applicability to foundation studio art courses. Dissertation Abstracts International, A63/01, p.10.Google Scholar
  18. Casten, C. S. (1983). The differences between dance programs allied with physical education departments and fine arts departments in American colleges and universities. Dissertation Abstracts International, A45/05, p. 1307.Google Scholar
  19. Cohen-Cruz, J. (2001). When the gown goes to town: The reciprocal rewards of fieldwork for artists. Theatre Topics, 11 (1), 55–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Colwell, R., & Richardson, C. (Eds.). (2002). The new handbook of research on music teaching and learning: A project of the Music Educators National Conference. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Craig, C. (1984). Teaching fiber art. Dissertation Abstracts International, A46/01, p. 53.Google Scholar
  22. Daniel, R. (2004). Peer assessment in musical performance: The development, trial and evaluation of a methodology for the Australian tertiary environment. British Journal of Music Education, 21 (1), 89–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Davis, D. (1991). Mime as an actor training technique: A professional problem. Dissertation Abstracts International, A52/06, p. 1945.Google Scholar
  24. Dolan, J. (1997). Advocacy and activism: identity, curriculum and theatre studies in the twenty-first century. Theatre Topics, 7 (1), 1–10.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Donovan, A. (1994). The interaction of personality traits in applied music teaching. Dissertation Abstracts International, A55/06, p. 1499.Google Scholar
  26. Eisner, E., & Day, M. (Eds.). (2004). Handbook of research and policy in art education. Mahwah, NJ: National Art Education Association: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  27. Fendlich, L. (2005, June 3). A portrait of the artist as a young mess. The Chronicle Review, p. B6.Google Scholar
  28. Forderhase, J. (1991). Attitudes toward team teaching as an approach to vocal instruction. Dissertation Abstracts International, A52/11, p. 3853.Google Scholar
  29. Fortin, S. (1998). Somatics: A tool for empowering modern dance teachers. In S. B. Shapiro (Ed.), Dance, power and difference: Critical and feminist perspectives on dance education. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.Google Scholar
  30. Fortin, S., Long, W., & Lord, M. (2002). Three voices: researching how somatic education informs contemporary dance technique classes. Research in dance education, 3 (2), 155–179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Freedman, K., & Stuhr, P. (2004). Curriculum change for the 21st Century: Visual culture in art education. In E. Eisner & M. Day (Eds.), Handbook of research and policy in art education (pp. 815–828). Mahweh, NJ: National Art Education Association: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  32. Gelbard, E. (1993). Dance graduate students: Their personality preferences and related instructional preferences. Dissertation Abstracts International, A54/10, p. 3620.Google Scholar
  33. Gillespie, P. (2004). Preface. In A. Fliotsos & G. Medford (Eds.), Teaching theatre today: Pedagogical view of theatre in higher education. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  34. Goffi, J. (1996). Applied voice instruction: Constructing a measure for evaluating teacher effectiveness. Dissertation Abstracts International, A57/12. p. 5093.Google Scholar
  35. Hagood, T. (2000). A history of dance in American higher education. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press.Google Scholar
  36. Hamalainen, S. (2002). Evaluation in choreographic pedagogy. Research in Dance Education, 3 (1), 35–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Harris, E. (1997). The arts. In J. Gaff & J. Ratcliff (Eds.), Handbook of the undergraduate curriculum: A comprehensive guide to purposes, structures, practices and change (pp. 320–340). San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.Google Scholar
  38. Hays, T. (1999). The music department in higher education: History, connections and conflicts, 1865–1998. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Loyola University of Chicago.Google Scholar
  39. Hennessey, P. (1995). Jazz education in the four-year institution: A comparative study of selected jazz curricula. Dissertation Abstracts International, A33/06, p. 1625.Google Scholar
  40. Hubbard, K., & Sofras, P. (1998). Strategies for including African and African-American culture in an historically Euro-Centric dance curriculum. The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, 69 (2), 77–82.Google Scholar
  41. Hunter, D., & Russ, M. (1996). Peer assessment in performance studies. British Journal of Music Education, 13, 67–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Inkster, M. (1997). A review of twelve outstanding university trumpet studios: A comparison of methodology, pedagogy and structure. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Florida State University.Google Scholar
  43. Ivins, J. (1993). The training of stage actors in film/video acting techniques: An interdisciplinary approach. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Texas Tech University.Google Scholar
  44. James, P. (1996). The construction of learning and teaching in a sculpture studio class. Studies in art education, 37 (3), 145–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Jorgensen, H. (2000). Student learning in higher instrumental education: Who is responsible? British Journal of Music Education, 17 (1), 67–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Kennell, R. (1989). Three teacher scaffolding strategies in college instrumental applied music instruction. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  47. Kennell, R. (2002). Systematic research in studio instruction in music. In R. Colwell & C. Richardson (Eds.), The new handbook of research on music teaching and learning: A project of the the Music Educators National Conference (pp. 243–256). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  48. Kent, L. A. (2001). The case of Lucio Pozzi: An artist/teacher’s studio critique method. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Columbia University Teachers College.Google Scholar
  49. Kostka, M. (2002). Practice expectations and attitudes: A survey of college-level music teachers and students. JRME, 50 (2), 145–154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Lavender, L. (1994). Critical evaluation in the choreography class. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, New York University.Google Scholar
  51. Lavender, L. (1996). Dancers talking dance: Critical evaluation in the choreography class. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.Google Scholar
  52. Lavender, R. (2003). The subordination of aesthetic fundamentals in college art instruction. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 37 (3), 41–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Leff, T. (1990). Texts and actors: Ensemble theatre in academe. New England Theatre Journal, 1, 101–108.Google Scholar
  54. Luftig, R., Donovan, M., & Farnbaugh, C. (2003). So what are you doing after college? An investigation of individuals studying the arts at the post-secondary level, their job aspirations and levels of realism. Studies in art education, 45 (1), 5–19.Google Scholar
  55. Medford, G. (2004). Deconstructing the dominant: Educational theatre in historically Black colleges and universities as critical pedagogy sites. In A. Fliotsos & G. Medford (Eds.), Teaching theatre today: pedagogical views of theatre in higher education (pp. 175–194). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  56. Murphy, D. (1990). The development of objectives for a model studio pedagogy component in the undergraduate jazz and contemporary music program. Dissertation Abstracts International, A51/10, p. 3355.Google Scholar
  57. Myers, D. (2002). Music education connections. In R. Colwell & C. Richardson (Eds.), The new handbook of research on music teaching and learning: A project of the Music Educators National Conference. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  58. Nascimento, C. (2001). Burning the (monologue) book: disobeying the rules of gender bias in beginning acting classes. Theatre Topics, 11 (2), 145–158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Nave, P. (2001). A survey of percussion studio curricula in the state universities of the United States and Puerto Rico. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Ohio State University.Google Scholar
  60. Nelson, S. (1980). The dance factory: A collegiate dance company as an artistic enterprise. Dissertation Abstracts International, A41/06, p.2334.Google Scholar
  61. Ney, S. (1989). Functions of academic theatre programs: An historical and critical study. Unpublished PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Champaign, IL.Google Scholar
  62. Nieminen, P., Varstala, V., & Manninen, M. (2001). Goal orientation and perceived purposes of dance among Finnish dance students: A pilot study. Research in dance education, 2 (2), 175–193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Pakes, A. (2003). Original embodied knowledge: The epistemology of the new in dance practice as research. Research in dance education, 4 (2), 127–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Parenti, S. (1996). Composing the music school: proposals for a feminist composition curriculum. Perspectives of New Music, 34 (1), 66–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Persson, R. (1996). Brilliant performers as teachers: A case study of commonsense teaching in a conservatoire setting. International Journal of Music Education, 28, 25–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Pitts, S. (2004). Starting a music degree at university. In J. Davidson (Ed.), The music practitioner: Research for the music performer, teacher and listener (pp. 215–224). Burlington, VT: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  67. Rabideau, M. (1998). The incorporation of jazz pedagogy in the traditional trombone studio. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Champaign, IL.Google Scholar
  68. Rack, J. E. (1996). Performance anxiety in student musicians: A correlational study. Dissertation Abstracts International, A57/01, p. 146.Google Scholar
  69. Reimer, D. (2003). Violin performance training at collegiate schools of music and its relevance to the performance professions: A critique and recommendation. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Ohio State University.Google Scholar
  70. Risner, D. (2000). Making dance, making sense: Epistemology and choreography. Research in dance education, 1 (2), 155–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Ritchie, A. (1966). The visual arts in higher education. New York: College Art Association of America.Google Scholar
  72. Roach, D. (1993). Attributions of success or failure in art courses. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland College Park.Google Scholar
  73. Roberts, B. (1993). I, musician. Towards a model of identity construction and maintenance by music education students as musicians. St. John’s, Newfoundland: Memorial University.Google Scholar
  74. Ross, J. (1998). The feminization of physical culture: The introduction of dance into the American university curriculum. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Stanford University.Google Scholar
  75. Ross, J. (2000). Moving lessons: Margaret H’Doubler and the beginning of dance in American education. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  76. Salapa, S. (2000). The relationship between student personality types and traits and instructor corrective feedback in dance education. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Central Florida.Google Scholar
  77. Schmor, J. (2004). Devising new theatre for college programs. Theatre Topics, 14 (1), 259–273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Searby, M., & Ewers, T. (1997). An evaluation of the use of peer assessment in higher education: a case study in the school of music, Kingston University. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 22 (4), 371–383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Shapiro, S. B. (Ed.). (1999). Dance, power and difference: Critical and feminist perspectives on dance education. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.Google Scholar
  80. Singerman, H. (1999). Art Subjects: Making artists in the American university. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  81. Sizer, T. (1996). Horace’s Hope: What works for the American High School. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
  82. Sterling, J. (2002). Reinventing music theory pedagogy: the develpment and use of a CAI program to guide students in the analysis of musical form. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park.Google Scholar
  83. Stevens, S. (2000). Choreographic pedagogy in higher education: Learning from practitioners. Research in dance education, 1 (1), 87–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Sullivan, G. (2004). Studio art as research practice. In E. Eisner & M. Day (Eds.), Handbook of research and policy in art education (pp. 795–814). Mahweh NJ: National Art Education Association: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  85. Sullivan, G. (2005). Art practice as research: inquiry in the visual arts. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publishing.Google Scholar
  86. Volk, T. (2004). Music, Education, and Multiculturalism: Foundations and Principles. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  87. Walker, H. (2001). Interviewing local artists: A curriculum resource in art teaching. Studies in art education, 42 (no. 3), 249–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Westin, M. (1996). Should the teaching of arts administration principles be a part of a music performance undergraduate student’s curriculum? Unpublished Master of Performing Arts, The American University.Google Scholar
  89. Wright-Evans, K. (2001). R2D2 goes to work: The design and development of a first-year art foundations course. Dissertation Abstracts International, A62/02, p. 427.Google Scholar

Higher Education Arts Curricula in Africa

  1. Avenstrup, R. (1997). Shaping Africa’s future through innovative curricula. Windhoek: Gamsberg MacMillan.Google Scholar
  2. Multi-Site Teacher Education Research Project. Retrieved November 18, 2005, from http://www.sussex.ac.uk/usie/muster
  3. Nzewi, M. (1998). Strategies for music education in Africa: Towards a meaningful progression from tradition to modern. In C. Van Niekerk (Ed.), Ubuntu: Music education for a humane society (pp. 456–486). Conference proceedings of the 23rd World Conference of the International Society for Music Education, Pretoria. Pretoria: UNISA Press.Google Scholar
  4. Saether, E. (2003). The Oral University. Attitudes to music teaching and learning in the Gambia. Studies in Music and Music Education no. 6. Lund: Malmö Academy of Music, Lund University.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eve Harwood
    • 1
  1. 1.University of IllinoisUrbana-ChampaignU.S.A.

Personalised recommendations