Reforming Mathematics Education: Theorising Teachers' and Students' Use of Technology

  • Merrilyn Goos
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 5)

Abstract

For some time, education researchers and curriculum policy-makers in Australia and elsewhere have recognised the potential for mathematics learning to be transformed by technologies such as computers and graphics calculators, and every Australian State and Territory has now developed mathematics syllabuses that mandate the use of these resources in high stakes assessment at the end of secondary school. This chapter explores the impact of these technology-related reforms on mathematics learning and teaching in the Australian context by analysing examples of classroom practice and teacher learning, and development drawn from a series of socioculturally oriented research studies. Its purpose is to interrogate assumptions about relationships between access to technology, its use by teachers, and the nature of students' technology-aided learning.

Keywords

Defend Stake Metaphor Dick Cuban 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Merrilyn Goos
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of Queensland, St. LuciaQueenslandAustralia

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