Natural Realism, Anti-reductionism, and Intentionality. The “Phenomenology” of Hilary Putnam

  • Dan Zahavi
Part of the Contributions to Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 51)

Abstract

The Centenary of Husserl’s Logische Untersuchungen is being celebrated this year. On such an occasion one might look back at the first 100 years of phenomenology, appraising that which has already been achieved, and taking comfort in the fact that phenomenology has been one of the dominant philosophical traditions in the 20th Century. However, one might also use the opportunity to reflect on the current status of phenomenology, and ask whether phenomenology will be able to maintain its position in the 21 st Century.

Keywords

Cholesterol Posit Defend Metaphor Shoe 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dan Zahavi
    • 1
  1. 1.Danish National Research Foundation: Center for Subjectivity ResearchUniversity of CopenhagenDenmark

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