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The role of polyp-stolon junctions in the redox signaling of colonial hydroids

  • Neil W. Blackstone
  • Kimberly S. Cherry
  • David H. Van Winkle
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Hydrobiology book series (DIHY, volume 178)

An encrusting colonial hydroid can be regarded as a network of polyps or ‘mouths’ connected by tube-like stolons. The success of the colony crucially depends on putting these mouths where the available food is. Feeding-related perturbations may provide important signals in this regard. After feeding, polyps contract regularly, dispersing food throughout the colony via the gastrovascular fluid. Mitochondrion-rich epitheliomuscular cells concentrated near polyp-stolon junctions likely drive these contractions. Putatively, the redox state of these cells may influence colony-level form. For instance, the metabolic demand associated with feeding-related contractions results in mitochondria that have relatively oxidized electron carriers and produce lesser amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS or other redox-sensitive molecules emitted from polyp-stolon junctions into the gastrovascular fluid may provide stolons with signals influencing elongation, branching, and regression. Treatments of colonies with anti-oxidants cause peripheral stolon tips to rapidly regress. This regression appears to be an active process involving a flux of locally produced peroxides and cell and tissue death. At the same time, polyps and stolon tips in the center of treated colonies remain healthy. ‘Sheet-like’ growth of short, branched stolons ensues. Signals that inhibit the outward growth of stolons may lead by default to the concentrated growth of stolons and polyps in food-rich areas. ROS may mediate signaling mechanisms involving nitric oxide, programmed cell death, a variety of redoxregulated proteins, or all of these.

Key words: epitheliomuscular cell, mitochondria, Podocoryna, Podocoryne, reactive oxygen species

Keywords

Redox Signaling Catalytic Cysteine Treated Coloni Colonial Hydroid Outward Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neil W. Blackstone
    • 1
  • Kimberly S. Cherry
    • 1
  • David H. Van Winkle
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalbUSA
  2. 2.USDA – ARS, University of NebraskaLincolnUSA

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