The Moral Competence of Serial Killers

A Preliminary Exploration
  • George B. Palermo
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 21)

Abstract

As disruptive, collective violence devastates communities and nations, individual violence, whether sudden or programmed, is frightening and appalling to victims and onlookers alike. Violence is ubiquitous and may be looked upon as historically periodical. This applies to both collective and individual violence. It may be intentional or not, and motivated by social or political vindications in the collective type, and by the explosive interaction of varied feelings, such as frustration and hatred, in the individual type. The interplay of negative feelings brings about its sudden destructiveness, even though at times the suddenness is a manifestation of previous ruminations as in the slowly programmed, vicious, sadistic murdering of people known or unknown to the violent aggressor.

Keywords

Depression Schizophrenia Serin Explosive Assure 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • George B. Palermo

There are no affiliations available

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