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Galileo’s Unpublished Treatises

A case study on the role of shared knowledge in the emergence and dissemination of an early modern “new science”
  • Jochen Büttner
  • Peter Damerow
  • Jürgen Renn
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 239)

Abstract

Galileo’s last publication, his Discorsi e dimostrazioni matematiche intorno a due nuove scienze attenenti alla mecanica & i movimenti locali (1638), is widely considered to be one of the most influential contributions of early modern science to the emergence of classical physics. As the title of Galileo’s book indicates, he himself claimed to have established “two new sciences,” including a new science of motion which, from the perspective of classical physics, indeed turned the Aristotelean theory of motion, which had prevailed for hundreds of years, into an obscure medieval relic.

Keywords

Shared Knowledge Classical Physic Early Modern Period Projectile Motion Ancient Tradition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jochen Büttner
  • Peter Damerow
  • Jürgen Renn

There are no affiliations available

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