Ultrasonic Sound Speed Microscope for Biological Tissue Characterization Driven by Nanosecond Pulse

  • N. Hozumi
  • R. Yamashita
  • C-K. Lee
  • M. Nagano
  • K. Kobayashi
  • Y. Saijo
  • M. Tanaka
  • N. Tanaka
  • S. Ohtsuki
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 27)

Abstract

Ultrasonic microscopy is expected as a powerful tool for biological tissue characterization. Its clinical application to histopathological examination during surgery is being considered. The data are also important to assess the origin of clinical echographic imaging. In clinical point of view, the microscopic observation should be as quick as possible to carry out the surgery in a short period.

Keywords

Attenuation Epoxy Lime Acoustics 

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References

  1. [1]
    Y. Saijo, M. Tanaka, H. Okawai, H. Sasaki, S. Nitta & F. Dunn: “Ultrasonic Tissue Characterization of Infarcted Myocadium by Scanning Acoustic Microscopy”, Ultrasound in Med. & Biol., 23–1, 77 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    H. Okawai, K Kobayashi & S. Nitta: “An Approach to Acoustic Properties of Biological Tissues Using Acoustic Microgfraphs of Attenuation Constant and Sound Speed”, J. Ultrasound Med., 20, 891 (2001).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Hozumi
    • 1
  • R. Yamashita
    • 1
  • C-K. Lee
    • 1
  • M. Nagano
    • 1
  • K. Kobayashi
    • 2
  • Y. Saijo
    • 3
  • M. Tanaka
    • 3
  • N. Tanaka
    • 4
  • S. Ohtsuki
    • 5
  1. 1.Toyohashi University of TechnologyToyohashiJapan
  2. 2.Honda Electronics Co., Ltd.Oiwa-cho, ToyohashiJapan
  3. 3.Tohoku UniversityAoba-ku, SendaiJapan
  4. 4.Sibaura Institute of TechnologyFukasaku, SaitamaJapan
  5. 5.Tokyo Institute of TechnologyMidori-ku, YokohamaJapan

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