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Nuclear Reactions of Cosmic Rays with Ground, Water, and Air Atoms; Production of Cosmogenic Nuclides

  • Lev I. Dorman
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 303)

Abstract

In any astrophysical object containing CR (of local and/or external origin) and matter a lot of stable and unstable cosmogenic isotopes will be continuously produced. This production is caused by nuclear reactions with matter of primary protons and nuclei as well as of secondary CR nuclear active particles. It takes place in space where secondary energetic particles generated in interactions of primary CR particles with space matter become a part of CR with changing elemental and isotopic contents. On the other hand the space matter also is changed by these nuclear interactions with generation of cosmogenic stable and unstable nuclides. The abundance and composition of cosmogenic nuclides will be determined by the variations of CR intensity (which lead to the time variation of cosmogenic generation rate) by the amount and composition of matter, by the decay time of unstable cosmogenic nuclides, and by exchange processes in the space (this problem will be considered in details in Dorman, M2005).

Keywords

Solar Cycle Sunspot Number Solar Energetic Particle Geomagnetic Latitude Solar Energetic Particle Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lev I. Dorman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Israel Cosmic Ray Center, Space Weather Center, and Emilio Segrè ObservatoryTel Aviv University, Israel Space Agency, and TechnionQazrinIsrael
  2. 2.Cosmic Ray Department of IZMIRANRussian Academy of ScienceTroitskRussia

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