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Cancer and Palliative Care Nursing: The Influence of Policy

  • Anita Fatchett
Chapter

Abstract

Palliative care must be included as part of governmental health policy as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Every individual has the right to pain relief, and palliative care must be provided according to the principle of equity, irrespective of race, gender, ethnicity, social status, national origin and the ability to pay for services (EAPC, 1995).

Keywords

Palliative Care National Health Service White Paper Palliative Care Service Professional Nurse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© David Clarke, Jean Flanagan and the estate of Kevin Kendrick 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anita Fatchett

There are no affiliations available

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